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Shenington Kart Racing Report Round 12

Shenington Kart Racing Report Round 12, 19 November 2017

After Saturday’s rain the raceday had sunshine all day and club members raised £300 for Children in Need.  James Pashley tracked his championship rival Zak Oates throughout the Junior TKM final, knowing there was no need for an attempt at the win in order to clinch the club championship crown.  The other championship contender Zak Taylor pulled off on the second lap with mechanical issues whilst Dan McKeown, also a contender, dropped out of third with a problem a little later.  That left a 6s gap to Spencer Stevenson who had held off Morgan Kidd throughout whilst Joel Oswick made it up to fifth.

In the senior TKM Clubman economy class on his way to winning the series Suk Sandher arrowed clear of Chris Yates who lost several places in the last hairpin elevating Chris Chater to second.  But Clive Carpenter stormed through to catch the leader and take the win, Chater surviving for third.

In TKM Extreme Joe Fowler rode off into the distance as locals Max Goldsmith and Reeves-Smith traded second place with some enthusiasm.  Eventually Reeves-Smith took the upper hand, Goldsmith falling to sixth.  Will Lakin retired from sixth place and Alex Rees lost many places soon after passing Goldsmith.  Meanwhile Dean Hale leapfrogged up the order into second demoting Reeves-Smith.  Josh Sherriff won the championship but was excluded from this race for driving standards.

In IAME Cadet Luke Watts raced clear with Maxwell Dodds on his tail until halfway through when Dodds found a gap and eased clear towards the finish.  Behind them Samuel Shaw and Bradley Beavers were fighting so hard there must have been six swaps, Shaw eventually in third but Beavers taking the championship by three points over Joe Sheppy.

Honda Cadet 4-stroke had a massive entry needing a B Final.  In the A Final Alfie Rigby got away in the lead at the start whilst the others bumped and barged round the second corner.  Eventually Daniel Powell joined forces with Archie Walker and drafted up to Rigby, Powell jumping into the lead.  But Rigby took it back only to lose to Walker until the last lap sortout when Rigby prevailed for the win over Walker. Lorenzo Kordal took third along with the championship and Powell dropped to sixth.

MiniX was won by Bowen Morris-Kent who also won the raffle for the Pudsey Bear, whilst Jack Salmon took the championship series.

Teddy Pritchard-Williams started Junior X30 in the lead until a huge battle ensued, the lead shared with him, Zak Bowen and Alessandro Ceronetti who would take the 2017 championship crown.  On the last lap Pritchard-Williams sliced past Bowen at Café Corner then took Ceronetti for the win, the Stratford driver dropping to fifth behind Alexander Walker.  In the very close run to the line Kaleb Marshall just cleared Bowen for second.

Report By Graham Smith

Photography by TSR Productions

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Shenington Kart Racing Report Round 12

Shenington Kart Racing Report Round 12, 19 November 2017

After Saturday’s rain the raceday had sunshine all day and club members raised £300 for Children in Need.  James Pashley tracked his championship rival Zak Oates throughout the Junior TKM final, knowing there was no need for an attempt at the win in order to clinch the club championship crown.  The other championship contender Zak Taylor pulled off on the second lap with mechanical issues whilst Dan McKeown, also a contender, dropped out of third with a problem a little later.  That left a 6s gap to Spencer Stevenson who had held off Morgan Kidd throughout whilst Joel Oswick made it up to fifth.

In the senior TKM Clubman economy class on his way to winning the series Suk Sandher arrowed clear of Chris Yates who lost several places in the last hairpin elevating Chris Chater to second.  But Clive Carpenter stormed through to catch the leader and take the win, Chater surviving for third.

In TKM Extreme Joe Fowler rode off into the distance as locals Max Goldsmith and Reeves-Smith traded second place with some enthusiasm.  Eventually Reeves-Smith took the upper hand, Goldsmith falling to sixth.  Will Lakin retired from sixth place and Alex Rees lost many places soon after passing Goldsmith.  Meanwhile Dean Hale leapfrogged up the order into second demoting Reeves-Smith.  Josh Sherriff won the championship but was excluded from this race for driving standards.

In IAME Cadet Luke Watts raced clear with Maxwell Dodds on his tail until halfway through when Dodds found a gap and eased clear towards the finish.  Behind them Samuel Shaw and Bradley Beavers were fighting so hard there must have been six swaps, Shaw eventually in third but Beavers taking the championship by three points over Joe Sheppy.

Honda Cadet 4-stroke had a massive entry needing a B Final.  In the A Final Alfie Rigby got away in the lead at the start whilst the others bumped and barged round the second corner.  Eventually Daniel Powell joined forces with Archie Walker and drafted up to Rigby, Powell jumping into the lead.  But Rigby took it back only to lose to Walker until the last lap sortout when Rigby prevailed for the win over Walker. Lorenzo Kordal took third along with the championship and Powell dropped to sixth.

MiniX was won by Bowen Morris-Kent who also won the raffle for the Pudsey Bear, whilst Jack Salmon took the championship series.

Teddy Pritchard-Williams started Junior X30 in the lead until a huge battle ensued, the lead shared with him, Zak Bowen and Alessandro Ceronetti who would take the 2017 championship crown.  On the last lap Pritchard-Williams sliced past Bowen at Café Corner then took Ceronetti for the win, the Stratford driver dropping to fifth behind Alexander Walker.  In the very close run to the line Kaleb Marshall just cleared Bowen for second.

Report By Graham Smith

Photography by TSR Productions

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MSA British Superkart Championship and BSA F450 Challenge – Round 12

Oulton Park 21st October 2017

Keeping it in the family – Clarks triumphant

Dan Clark finally secured the MSA British Superkart Championship after a calculated drive netted him sufficient points. Cousin Stephen added to the family celebrations by regaining the F450 four stroke championship.

The MSA Championship returned to Oulton Park after missing out last year. With storm Brian threatening the North-West area, weather conditions were not ideal with the possibility of cancelled races. Following the judicial hearing by the Motor Sports Council and the exclusion of Paul Platt from race 2 at Cadwell in July, the championships points were recalculated. This meant that three drivers were still in with a chance of lifting the number 1 plate. After a free practice session, there was a fifteen-minute timed qualifying session. James Hassall was due to have a run out for the first time this year but wrecked the DEA in testing the day before and Gareth James was also a non-starter. Matt Isherwood was having his first taste of racing a 250 National when he joined the Parker Motorsport team for the weekend, using Barry Weston’s Anderson DEA. Dan Clark had a scare in testing on Friday when a misfire re-appeared on his Gas Gas but it was traced to a faulty ignition wire. In the wet qually session there were no such problems and after 2 laps he had pole position by 1.6s. But the Parker Motorsport team were working in tandem.

Layton was towing round Isherwood and after 3 laps Isherwood claimed pole position with a time of 1m 52.669s. Fantastic. “It’s easier to drive than the 125cc kart I am used to but great fun.” Clark was on a quicker lap when he came across Layton and Isherwood touring back to the pits but couldn’t improve on his earlier lap so occupied the other front row slot with a 1m 52.844s. Layton chipped away at his times but ended up over a second slower than his team mate, third quickest on 1m 53.674s. “The wet tyres didn’t feel great and I am not sure what to do for the race.” Andy Bird had gained 5 points as a result of the judicial hearing which meant he was in with a chance of taking the title. In Friday testing he had run in a new Gas Gas barrel and was confident of a good result. On used wet tyres he set a 1m 54.161s lap to close out the second row. James O’Reilly was slow off the mark in the qually session and with 75s left on the clock put in a time of 1m 54.188s to head up row 3. He was joined by the leading F450 kart of Stephen Clark who was looking to regain the four-stroke championship that he lost at Pembrey last year when the final round was cancelled. Aaron Sifleet had got his Gas Gas running well and headed up row 4 with a time of 1m 55.436s. He was joined by Paul Platt who was having to run reversed used wets and only managed a 1m 55.792s.  “I have got two brand new sets for the races though.” Gavin Bennett was also in with a chance of taking the MSA Championship. He struggled to get on the pace but did record a 1m 55.796s before pitting with a water pump issue. The team then set about swapping engines ahead of the opening race. Completing the top ten and second quickest in the F450 class was Charlie Johnson with 1m 55.916s.

The weather still required wets to be used for race 1 and when the lights went out Isherwood kept his cool and led into Old Hall Corner chased by Clark, Layton and Bird. Bennett made a great start from row 5 and was up the inside of Sifleet, O’Reilly to take fifth place as the field headed down the Avenue to Cascades for the first time. Layton dispensed with Clark and set about his Parker Motorsport team mate. But Isherwood was not prepared to give up the lead and they were side by side heading into the Knickerbrook Chicane for the first time. The ‘new boy’ held his ground and at the end of the opening lap had a slight lead of 0.82s. Layton was fending off Clark with Bennett looming large in fourth spot. Bird, the other championship contender, was next ahead of Sifleet with Johnson leading the 450 class ahead of Platt. Bennett knew he had to win the race and passed Clark and then got ahead of Layton for second place at Knickerbrook on lap 2. Bird’s title hopes deflated when he crawled into the pits with a mysterious left rear puncture. O’Reilly spun out of 9th place at Old Hall while Platt went off at Shell. Both drivers continued but they were down in 13th and 14th places after 2 laps. Bennett was in determined mood and took the lead at Knickerbrook on lap 3, but Isherwood clung on. They were only separated by a tenth of a second as they crossed the line to start lap 4. Could Isherwood fight back. Sadly no.

The gap was up to a second at the end of the lap and had doubled next time around. On lap 6 he pulled off when the motor seized after the fuel pump failed. The end of a great drive. Layton took over second place and started to reduce the gap. On the last lap they encountered three back markers that were having their own private dice. Bennett came off worse but held on to get the crucial win by 0.785s from the current champion. “I knew what I had to do after battling with Matt and that was to get the win,” explained Bennett. But he was the first to walk across to Dan Clark in parc ferme and congratulate him on finally winning the MSA British Superkart Championship. Clark had been happy to sit behind the group knowing that fourth place was all he needed. When Isherwood dropped out his job was made easier. But he gave the team a scare in the closing stages. “I backed off to worry my Dad and the team on the pit wall, but I had it all under control.” He crossed the line just over 12s behind Bennett but was still 10.7s ahead of Sifleet who drove a great race to collect 4th place, his best result of the season. Stephen Clark made up for a slowish start to catch and pass Charlie Johnson on lap 3. He reeled off the remaining laps to secure the F450 Challenge and make it a double family celebration. Johnson kept him in sight to claim second place in the four-stroke class. Ross Allen was heading for 7th place but he had a gearbox failure on lap 7 which badly damaged the cases of his DEA motor. Platt inherited the spot but was passed by fellow spinner O’Reilly on the final lap as he set the fastest lap of the race.

With the championship wrapped up Clark decided to sit out race 2. Allen was also a non-starter with his DEA showing a big crack in the cases. O’Reilly had pole position with Layton alongside while Bennett and Isherwood lined up behind. When the lights changed O’Reilly led the field into Old Hall for the first time with Bennett tucked in behind. However, the Viper engine wasn’t on full song. Bennett took the lead and at the end of the opening lap he was ahead of Isherwood and Platt. O’Reilly had slipped to fourth and was fending of Stephen Clark on the 450 KTM with Layton down in sixth place. Andy Bird had started at the back of the grid and was already up to 12th place.  Platt took second place at Knickerbrook on lap 2 and was closing on Bennett at the end of the lap with Clark up to third. Layton had gone missing on lap 2, going off at Shell Oils Corner. Next time round at the same corner Andy Gulliford, who was holding 6th place, skated off on the wet, oily surface into the back of Layton’s kart. The red flags were shown and the race was stopped. Jack was expertly lifted out of his kart and into an ambulance but thankfully after precautionary x-rays he was only badly bruised with a sore back while Andy escaped any injury. With the timetable having no room for delays and stoppages there was insufficient time to get a re-start. The race was declared void as only one full lap had been completed by everyone. A sad way to finish the championship but it was good to see later that all the drivers were ok.

Race One (8 laps) 1 Gavin Bennett (Anderson DEA) 15m08.923s (85.29mph); 2 Jack Layton (Anderson DEA) +0.785s; 3 Dan Clark (Anderson Gas Gas); 4 Aaron Sifleet (Anderson Gas Gas); 5 Stephen Clark (Anderson KTM 450); 6 Charlie Johnson (Anderson KTM). Fastest Lap James O’Reilly (Anderson Viper) 1m52.078s (86.46mph).

Final MSA British Superkart Championship Positions after 12 rounds (Best 9 scores to count)

1 Dan Clark             319 pts

2 Gavin Bennett       305

3 Jack Layton           297

4 Andy Bird             287

5 Paul Platt              253

6 Ross Allen             217

 

Words by Gary James

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MSA British Superkart Championship and BSA F450 Challenge – Round 12

Oulton Park 21st October 2017

Keeping it in the family – Clarks triumphant

Dan Clark finally secured the MSA British Superkart Championship after a calculated drive netted him sufficient points. Cousin Stephen added to the family celebrations by regaining the F450 four stroke championship.

The MSA Championship returned to Oulton Park after missing out last year. With storm Brian threatening the North-West area, weather conditions were not ideal with the possibility of cancelled races. Following the judicial hearing by the Motor Sports Council and the exclusion of Paul Platt from race 2 at Cadwell in July, the championships points were recalculated. This meant that three drivers were still in with a chance of lifting the number 1 plate. After a free practice session, there was a fifteen-minute timed qualifying session. James Hassall was due to have a run out for the first time this year but wrecked the DEA in testing the day before and Gareth James was also a non-starter. Matt Isherwood was having his first taste of racing a 250 National when he joined the Parker Motorsport team for the weekend, using Barry Weston’s Anderson DEA. Dan Clark had a scare in testing on Friday when a misfire re-appeared on his Gas Gas but it was traced to a faulty ignition wire. In the wet qually session there were no such problems and after 2 laps he had pole position by 1.6s. But the Parker Motorsport team were working in tandem.

Layton was towing round Isherwood and after 3 laps Isherwood claimed pole position with a time of 1m 52.669s. Fantastic. “It’s easier to drive than the 125cc kart I am used to but great fun.” Clark was on a quicker lap when he came across Layton and Isherwood touring back to the pits but couldn’t improve on his earlier lap so occupied the other front row slot with a 1m 52.844s. Layton chipped away at his times but ended up over a second slower than his team mate, third quickest on 1m 53.674s. “The wet tyres didn’t feel great and I am not sure what to do for the race.” Andy Bird had gained 5 points as a result of the judicial hearing which meant he was in with a chance of taking the title. In Friday testing he had run in a new Gas Gas barrel and was confident of a good result. On used wet tyres he set a 1m 54.161s lap to close out the second row. James O’Reilly was slow off the mark in the qually session and with 75s left on the clock put in a time of 1m 54.188s to head up row 3. He was joined by the leading F450 kart of Stephen Clark who was looking to regain the four-stroke championship that he lost at Pembrey last year when the final round was cancelled. Aaron Sifleet had got his Gas Gas running well and headed up row 4 with a time of 1m 55.436s. He was joined by Paul Platt who was having to run reversed used wets and only managed a 1m 55.792s.  “I have got two brand new sets for the races though.” Gavin Bennett was also in with a chance of taking the MSA Championship. He struggled to get on the pace but did record a 1m 55.796s before pitting with a water pump issue. The team then set about swapping engines ahead of the opening race. Completing the top ten and second quickest in the F450 class was Charlie Johnson with 1m 55.916s.

The weather still required wets to be used for race 1 and when the lights went out Isherwood kept his cool and led into Old Hall Corner chased by Clark, Layton and Bird. Bennett made a great start from row 5 and was up the inside of Sifleet, O’Reilly to take fifth place as the field headed down the Avenue to Cascades for the first time. Layton dispensed with Clark and set about his Parker Motorsport team mate. But Isherwood was not prepared to give up the lead and they were side by side heading into the Knickerbrook Chicane for the first time. The ‘new boy’ held his ground and at the end of the opening lap had a slight lead of 0.82s. Layton was fending off Clark with Bennett looming large in fourth spot. Bird, the other championship contender, was next ahead of Sifleet with Johnson leading the 450 class ahead of Platt. Bennett knew he had to win the race and passed Clark and then got ahead of Layton for second place at Knickerbrook on lap 2. Bird’s title hopes deflated when he crawled into the pits with a mysterious left rear puncture. O’Reilly spun out of 9th place at Old Hall while Platt went off at Shell. Both drivers continued but they were down in 13th and 14th places after 2 laps. Bennett was in determined mood and took the lead at Knickerbrook on lap 3, but Isherwood clung on. They were only separated by a tenth of a second as they crossed the line to start lap 4. Could Isherwood fight back. Sadly no.

The gap was up to a second at the end of the lap and had doubled next time around. On lap 6 he pulled off when the motor seized after the fuel pump failed. The end of a great drive. Layton took over second place and started to reduce the gap. On the last lap they encountered three back markers that were having their own private dice. Bennett came off worse but held on to get the crucial win by 0.785s from the current champion. “I knew what I had to do after battling with Matt and that was to get the win,” explained Bennett. But he was the first to walk across to Dan Clark in parc ferme and congratulate him on finally winning the MSA British Superkart Championship. Clark had been happy to sit behind the group knowing that fourth place was all he needed. When Isherwood dropped out his job was made easier. But he gave the team a scare in the closing stages. “I backed off to worry my Dad and the team on the pit wall, but I had it all under control.” He crossed the line just over 12s behind Bennett but was still 10.7s ahead of Sifleet who drove a great race to collect 4th place, his best result of the season. Stephen Clark made up for a slowish start to catch and pass Charlie Johnson on lap 3. He reeled off the remaining laps to secure the F450 Challenge and make it a double family celebration. Johnson kept him in sight to claim second place in the four-stroke class. Ross Allen was heading for 7th place but he had a gearbox failure on lap 7 which badly damaged the cases of his DEA motor. Platt inherited the spot but was passed by fellow spinner O’Reilly on the final lap as he set the fastest lap of the race.

With the championship wrapped up Clark decided to sit out race 2. Allen was also a non-starter with his DEA showing a big crack in the cases. O’Reilly had pole position with Layton alongside while Bennett and Isherwood lined up behind. When the lights changed O’Reilly led the field into Old Hall for the first time with Bennett tucked in behind. However, the Viper engine wasn’t on full song. Bennett took the lead and at the end of the opening lap he was ahead of Isherwood and Platt. O’Reilly had slipped to fourth and was fending of Stephen Clark on the 450 KTM with Layton down in sixth place. Andy Bird had started at the back of the grid and was already up to 12th place.  Platt took second place at Knickerbrook on lap 2 and was closing on Bennett at the end of the lap with Clark up to third. Layton had gone missing on lap 2, going off at Shell Oils Corner. Next time round at the same corner Andy Gulliford, who was holding 6th place, skated off on the wet, oily surface into the back of Layton’s kart. The red flags were shown and the race was stopped. Jack was expertly lifted out of his kart and into an ambulance but thankfully after precautionary x-rays he was only badly bruised with a sore back while Andy escaped any injury. With the timetable having no room for delays and stoppages there was insufficient time to get a re-start. The race was declared void as only one full lap had been completed by everyone. A sad way to finish the championship but it was good to see later that all the drivers were ok.

Race One (8 laps) 1 Gavin Bennett (Anderson DEA) 15m08.923s (85.29mph); 2 Jack Layton (Anderson DEA) +0.785s; 3 Dan Clark (Anderson Gas Gas); 4 Aaron Sifleet (Anderson Gas Gas); 5 Stephen Clark (Anderson KTM 450); 6 Charlie Johnson (Anderson KTM). Fastest Lap James O’Reilly (Anderson Viper) 1m52.078s (86.46mph).

Final MSA British Superkart Championship Positions after 12 rounds (Best 9 scores to count)

1 Dan Clark             319 pts

2 Gavin Bennett       305

3 Jack Layton           297

4 Andy Bird             287

5 Paul Platt              253

6 Ross Allen             217

 

Words by Gary James

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Club100 2017 Round 10 Report – Heavys

Club 100 Sprints Round 10 Whilton Mill

The second visit of the year to Whilton Mill and this time using the shorter ‘Zulu’ circuit which turns the flat right handed Inkermans into a tight hairpin before running into a short straight and then a tricky left, right, left sequence of corners known as Zulus one, two and three and named not after some African tribe or 60’s film but christened after the circuit owners dog. The final left hander leads onto the back straight. Some love the configuration and some loathe it but never let it be said that Club 100 doesn’t supply variety.

Into the afternoon and the clouds finally began to break up to give the fine weather the weather forecasters had promised for the Lightweights and Heavyweights/ Super Heavyweights events. And it was good to see a healthy turnout too necessitating B finals in both categories.

Qualifying

Group one

Adrian Brammer looked as though he was going to be quickest in Group one but it was newcomer Henry Jackson who surprised everyone setting the fastest time and breaking the forty four second mark. Sadly, he was excluded for being underweight. Championship contender James Browning ended up at the top of the timesheet from a surprised Andy Cowell who isn’t the best of qualifiers normally. Brammer took third from Andrew Dawson with Craig Rankine fifth.

Group two

Adam Wright took this one from Championship leader Mark Ridout. It was mightily close though with just 0.013 separating them. Alexander Lammin was third fastest from Ben Cottle and Chris James whilst Pete Gillet was the fastest of the SHW runners.

Pre B Final

Thirty runners for this one. Great to see. Mark Turner on pole from Daljeet Bahia with Paul Goddard next alongside Roger Mullen. Row three, Pete Gillett and Andrew Clarke with Nick Divers and Martin Gurnett on four. Jordan Salter and Shawn Morter completed the top ten. Turner made no mistake across the line at the start holding the pack and then flooring the throttle at just the right moment to lead by a few Kart lengths by the first turn. Immediately behind Goddard tried to go with him but had to fall in behind Bahia. But not for long. He dived up the inside into Inkermans but made contact. Turner was well clear of the pack as he crossed the line at the end of the lap but Goddard in second was now carrying the burden of a three place penalty. He had to win to progress. Bahia ran third ahead of Mullen and Gillett. Turner continued to lead with Goddard still in touch but not closing him down.

The two of them though were pulling well clear of the battle for third now led by Mullen from Bahia with Josh Pettit into fifth having climbed up from Grid twelve. Pettit’s impressive run came to an end with a spin promoting Shawn Mortar into fifth but well behind fourth and qualification. But with three to go Mullen spun out of contention. Turner took the win from Goddard who then dropped to fifth after his penalty. He was the quickest of the SHW group. Unfortunate this because it had been a really strong drive from the SHW. Bahia was a lonely third on the road some six seconds clear of fourth placed Morter but he too was carrying a penalty after exceeding the track limits once too often. Still, fourth was good enough. Gillett was placed third. Down the order and unnoticed by many was a really string drive from Henry Jackson. Having been excluded from qualifying he started in thirtieth position but worked his way up to eighth by the flag and set fastest lap in the process.

Pre A final

Pole for Browning with Wright alongside and Championship leader Ridout alongside Lammin on row two. Cowell and Cottle on row three from Brammer and Dawson with James and Wood completing the top ten. Poleman Browning detected a fault on his machine and was quickly into the pits for a Kart change which gave the rest of the field a few extra rolling up laps and a chance to warm the tyres. Browning got away from the start well enough but he would later state that his second machine didn’t feel quite right. All in the mind James? Out of Inkermans for the first time Ridout had the better exit and moved to the front whilst Browning defended resolutely from Wright. Behind, Cowell had got the better of Lammin at the start to hold fourth from Lammin, Cottle and a fast starting Wood. With three laps run Ridout still led and had opened a gap to Browning.

Wright was trying everything he knew to get by but was constantly rebuffed. Down through the Zulus’ for the fourth time though Wright timed his run to perfection and as Browning moved to the left on the exit to cover a move down the inside into the boot Wright remained on the right and simply drove past him. He immediately began to pull away and close down the leader whilst Browning was now defending from Lammin. Cowell meanwhile had Cottle close behind along with Wood. Into the Boot Cottle slipped ahead and Wood tried to follow him through. Unfortunately he made heavy contact with Cowell spinning the latter to a halt. Wood also got held up allowing Dawson up in to sixth. At the front Wright continued to close down the leader and on the penultimate lap he got a good run up the hill and took over at the front. Behind Browning had finally succumbed to the pressure from Lammin and dropped to fourth. Wright took the win by a couple of tenths from Ridout with Lammin third from Browning who had to fight off a late race challenge from Cottle and Dawson. Wood was next over the line but his six place penalty saw him drop out of the top ten. Forkes took seventh and set fastest lap with Rankine, Hill and Turner completing the top ten. A great performance from Turner, climbing eleven places through the race.

B Final

Jackson on pole from Mullen with Goddard and Divers on row two and Trafford and Clarke on three. Jackson was smartly away but Mullen lost out falling to fifth by the end of the lap. Goddard moved into second chased hard by Trafford with Kelman up to fourth from grid nine. Jackson quickly pulled clear at the front as Goddard fought to keep Trafford behind. But not for long. With three laps gone Trafford moved into second and immediately began to pull clear of Goddard whilst Kelman dropped out of fourth place after a spin which allowed Mitchell into fourth having started down on grid thirteen. Jackson continued to stretch his lead at the front and set the fastest lap of the race on the final tour whilst Trafford was an equally comfortable second ahead of Goddard and Mitchell. And this time there were no problems at the scales.

A Final

Forkes on pole from Wright with Wood and Cottle on row two. Browning and Ridout side by side on row three. Dawson and Gooch on four with Lammin and Cowell completing the top ten. Forkes led away from pole but it was Wood into second as Wright dropped to third with Browning and Ridout fourth and fifth. Down through the Zulu’s for the second time Browning muscled his way through into second and Ridout followed him through dropping Wright to fourth with Dawson fifth and Wood sixth. Forkes led across the line but as they ran up the hill for the third time Wright was back into third. Where was Ridout? At the end of the lap he crossed the line sixteenth and post race would admit that he’d simply made a mistake and run wide out of the first turn. Unlike some on the day though he didn’t throw in the towel at the first sign of adversity. Forkes still led and had pulled out a lead of over two seconds as the rest of the pack fought over second. But Browning began to close and was soon up with the leader and challenging hard finally getting close enough to try a move into the first turn.  He couldn’t quite make the move stick though round the outside but it seemed like only a matter of time and at half distance he was through into the lead at Inkermans. Dawson followed him through having demoted Wright a lap earlier.

Forkes though didn’t fall away and was holding off Wright for third. It was still anyone’s race and Browning was having to defend for all his worth from Dawson who in turn needed to keep a wary eye on Forkes and Wright. With four to go there was barely a cigarette paper between them. Into Christmas Dawson made a move which Browning defended and as Forkes exited the corner Dawson lost control and spun baulking Forkes and allowing Wright into second. He then set about chasing down Browning for the lead. Meanwhile down the order Hill, who had driven a barnstorming race up from grid nineteen and into the top ten got tagged by Rankine on the start and fish straight and spun to a halt at the pit lane exit. It turned out to be race defining moment. As the leaders came into the Boot for the final time Wright took his chance but Browning kept well to the inside forcing Wright to go the long way round. But he had greater momentum and looked to be well set to move into the lead at the final turn. But the yellow flags were waving. Wright beat the wheel in frustration. He would surely have taken the win but a jubilant Browning crossed the line a couple of Kart lengths ahead of a disgruntled Wright with Forkes an excellent third. Wood came home a lonely but worthy fourth ahead of Lammin who took the place by a virtue a penalty for Cottle for cone abuse. Ridout took seventh after a great fight back with Jackson a fine eighth after starting at the back. One can only speculate as to where he would have been had he not been excluded from qualifying. Still, he did get his monies worth from the day and a trophy for winning the B Final.

Williams and Turner completed the top ten with Nick Trafford winning the SHW division.

Podiums and Championships

A much needed win for James Browning. It was hard earned too as held off a determined challenge from Mark Wright who was clearly a touch miffed over his rivals resolute defence. Personally I saw nothing wrong and neither did the officials. Matt Forkes third place was well deserved. Having seen his big lead cut I thought he might slip down the order but he didn’t and was still in with a shot at the win at the death. The izone award was just reward.

And a trophy too for Henry Jackson for winning the B Final. A good day for him and hopefully he’ll return for some more

Mark Ridout still leads the Championship but the gap is just one point from James Browning with Adam Wright still well in the hunt just ten points adrift. It’s going to be a tense final two rounds. Nick Trafford took the SHW honours again and he is the hot favourite to win the SHW crown.

Reflections

Another great days racing at Whilton but it was a great shame that JV had to lay down the law after the first two Clubman’s races had to be restarted. Hearing drivers claiming that other drivers were deliberately turning into other drivers or driving people off the track is not good. All drivers have a responsibility to their fellow competitors. We want to see good clean racing with drivers showing each other respect. Take heed.

I must admit I struggle sometimes to understand the mindset of some drivers and not just with regard to driving standards. I had harsh words for a couple of them in the paddock after they had retired healthy Karts. It’s true they weren’t going to win but I just don’t get why you would spend money testing, spend money on overnight accommodation and travelling, money on racing and then pull out with plenty of laps to run. Track time is important so why not take full advantage. You don’t learn anything stood in the pits. There are drivers racing who will probably never trouble the podium but they don’t just give up. They drive and race for the joy of it. I grew up in a sporting household. Football, Cricket, Snooker and Table tennis were the main games. And one thing I was taught was that that you never give in. Winners don’t quit and Champions don’t give in. Quitting displays a mental fragility. If I were competing I’d play on that. Or am I missing something?

See you at Bayford!!

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Report written by Chris Simpson

Photography: Jack Mitchell – JAM Motorsport Photography

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Club100 2017 Round 10 Report – Heavys

Club 100 Sprints Round 10 Whilton Mill

The second visit of the year to Whilton Mill and this time using the shorter ‘Zulu’ circuit which turns the flat right handed Inkermans into a tight hairpin before running into a short straight and then a tricky left, right, left sequence of corners known as Zulus one, two and three and named not after some African tribe or 60’s film but christened after the circuit owners dog. The final left hander leads onto the back straight. Some love the configuration and some loathe it but never let it be said that Club 100 doesn’t supply variety.

Into the afternoon and the clouds finally began to break up to give the fine weather the weather forecasters had promised for the Lightweights and Heavyweights/ Super Heavyweights events. And it was good to see a healthy turnout too necessitating B finals in both categories.

Qualifying

Group one

Adrian Brammer looked as though he was going to be quickest in Group one but it was newcomer Henry Jackson who surprised everyone setting the fastest time and breaking the forty four second mark. Sadly, he was excluded for being underweight. Championship contender James Browning ended up at the top of the timesheet from a surprised Andy Cowell who isn’t the best of qualifiers normally. Brammer took third from Andrew Dawson with Craig Rankine fifth.

Group two

Adam Wright took this one from Championship leader Mark Ridout. It was mightily close though with just 0.013 separating them. Alexander Lammin was third fastest from Ben Cottle and Chris James whilst Pete Gillet was the fastest of the SHW runners.

Pre B Final

Thirty runners for this one. Great to see. Mark Turner on pole from Daljeet Bahia with Paul Goddard next alongside Roger Mullen. Row three, Pete Gillett and Andrew Clarke with Nick Divers and Martin Gurnett on four. Jordan Salter and Shawn Morter completed the top ten. Turner made no mistake across the line at the start holding the pack and then flooring the throttle at just the right moment to lead by a few Kart lengths by the first turn. Immediately behind Goddard tried to go with him but had to fall in behind Bahia. But not for long. He dived up the inside into Inkermans but made contact. Turner was well clear of the pack as he crossed the line at the end of the lap but Goddard in second was now carrying the burden of a three place penalty. He had to win to progress. Bahia ran third ahead of Mullen and Gillett. Turner continued to lead with Goddard still in touch but not closing him down.

The two of them though were pulling well clear of the battle for third now led by Mullen from Bahia with Josh Pettit into fifth having climbed up from Grid twelve. Pettit’s impressive run came to an end with a spin promoting Shawn Mortar into fifth but well behind fourth and qualification. But with three to go Mullen spun out of contention. Turner took the win from Goddard who then dropped to fifth after his penalty. He was the quickest of the SHW group. Unfortunate this because it had been a really strong drive from the SHW. Bahia was a lonely third on the road some six seconds clear of fourth placed Morter but he too was carrying a penalty after exceeding the track limits once too often. Still, fourth was good enough. Gillett was placed third. Down the order and unnoticed by many was a really string drive from Henry Jackson. Having been excluded from qualifying he started in thirtieth position but worked his way up to eighth by the flag and set fastest lap in the process.

Pre A final

Pole for Browning with Wright alongside and Championship leader Ridout alongside Lammin on row two. Cowell and Cottle on row three from Brammer and Dawson with James and Wood completing the top ten. Poleman Browning detected a fault on his machine and was quickly into the pits for a Kart change which gave the rest of the field a few extra rolling up laps and a chance to warm the tyres. Browning got away from the start well enough but he would later state that his second machine didn’t feel quite right. All in the mind James? Out of Inkermans for the first time Ridout had the better exit and moved to the front whilst Browning defended resolutely from Wright. Behind, Cowell had got the better of Lammin at the start to hold fourth from Lammin, Cottle and a fast starting Wood. With three laps run Ridout still led and had opened a gap to Browning.

Wright was trying everything he knew to get by but was constantly rebuffed. Down through the Zulus’ for the fourth time though Wright timed his run to perfection and as Browning moved to the left on the exit to cover a move down the inside into the boot Wright remained on the right and simply drove past him. He immediately began to pull away and close down the leader whilst Browning was now defending from Lammin. Cowell meanwhile had Cottle close behind along with Wood. Into the Boot Cottle slipped ahead and Wood tried to follow him through. Unfortunately he made heavy contact with Cowell spinning the latter to a halt. Wood also got held up allowing Dawson up in to sixth. At the front Wright continued to close down the leader and on the penultimate lap he got a good run up the hill and took over at the front. Behind Browning had finally succumbed to the pressure from Lammin and dropped to fourth. Wright took the win by a couple of tenths from Ridout with Lammin third from Browning who had to fight off a late race challenge from Cottle and Dawson. Wood was next over the line but his six place penalty saw him drop out of the top ten. Forkes took seventh and set fastest lap with Rankine, Hill and Turner completing the top ten. A great performance from Turner, climbing eleven places through the race.

B Final

Jackson on pole from Mullen with Goddard and Divers on row two and Trafford and Clarke on three. Jackson was smartly away but Mullen lost out falling to fifth by the end of the lap. Goddard moved into second chased hard by Trafford with Kelman up to fourth from grid nine. Jackson quickly pulled clear at the front as Goddard fought to keep Trafford behind. But not for long. With three laps gone Trafford moved into second and immediately began to pull clear of Goddard whilst Kelman dropped out of fourth place after a spin which allowed Mitchell into fourth having started down on grid thirteen. Jackson continued to stretch his lead at the front and set the fastest lap of the race on the final tour whilst Trafford was an equally comfortable second ahead of Goddard and Mitchell. And this time there were no problems at the scales.

A Final

Forkes on pole from Wright with Wood and Cottle on row two. Browning and Ridout side by side on row three. Dawson and Gooch on four with Lammin and Cowell completing the top ten. Forkes led away from pole but it was Wood into second as Wright dropped to third with Browning and Ridout fourth and fifth. Down through the Zulu’s for the second time Browning muscled his way through into second and Ridout followed him through dropping Wright to fourth with Dawson fifth and Wood sixth. Forkes led across the line but as they ran up the hill for the third time Wright was back into third. Where was Ridout? At the end of the lap he crossed the line sixteenth and post race would admit that he’d simply made a mistake and run wide out of the first turn. Unlike some on the day though he didn’t throw in the towel at the first sign of adversity. Forkes still led and had pulled out a lead of over two seconds as the rest of the pack fought over second. But Browning began to close and was soon up with the leader and challenging hard finally getting close enough to try a move into the first turn.  He couldn’t quite make the move stick though round the outside but it seemed like only a matter of time and at half distance he was through into the lead at Inkermans. Dawson followed him through having demoted Wright a lap earlier.

Forkes though didn’t fall away and was holding off Wright for third. It was still anyone’s race and Browning was having to defend for all his worth from Dawson who in turn needed to keep a wary eye on Forkes and Wright. With four to go there was barely a cigarette paper between them. Into Christmas Dawson made a move which Browning defended and as Forkes exited the corner Dawson lost control and spun baulking Forkes and allowing Wright into second. He then set about chasing down Browning for the lead. Meanwhile down the order Hill, who had driven a barnstorming race up from grid nineteen and into the top ten got tagged by Rankine on the start and fish straight and spun to a halt at the pit lane exit. It turned out to be race defining moment. As the leaders came into the Boot for the final time Wright took his chance but Browning kept well to the inside forcing Wright to go the long way round. But he had greater momentum and looked to be well set to move into the lead at the final turn. But the yellow flags were waving. Wright beat the wheel in frustration. He would surely have taken the win but a jubilant Browning crossed the line a couple of Kart lengths ahead of a disgruntled Wright with Forkes an excellent third. Wood came home a lonely but worthy fourth ahead of Lammin who took the place by a virtue a penalty for Cottle for cone abuse. Ridout took seventh after a great fight back with Jackson a fine eighth after starting at the back. One can only speculate as to where he would have been had he not been excluded from qualifying. Still, he did get his monies worth from the day and a trophy for winning the B Final.

Williams and Turner completed the top ten with Nick Trafford winning the SHW division.

Podiums and Championships

A much needed win for James Browning. It was hard earned too as held off a determined challenge from Mark Wright who was clearly a touch miffed over his rivals resolute defence. Personally I saw nothing wrong and neither did the officials. Matt Forkes third place was well deserved. Having seen his big lead cut I thought he might slip down the order but he didn’t and was still in with a shot at the win at the death. The izone award was just reward.

And a trophy too for Henry Jackson for winning the B Final. A good day for him and hopefully he’ll return for some more

Mark Ridout still leads the Championship but the gap is just one point from James Browning with Adam Wright still well in the hunt just ten points adrift. It’s going to be a tense final two rounds. Nick Trafford took the SHW honours again and he is the hot favourite to win the SHW crown.

Reflections

Another great days racing at Whilton but it was a great shame that JV had to lay down the law after the first two Clubman’s races had to be restarted. Hearing drivers claiming that other drivers were deliberately turning into other drivers or driving people off the track is not good. All drivers have a responsibility to their fellow competitors. We want to see good clean racing with drivers showing each other respect. Take heed.

I must admit I struggle sometimes to understand the mindset of some drivers and not just with regard to driving standards. I had harsh words for a couple of them in the paddock after they had retired healthy Karts. It’s true they weren’t going to win but I just don’t get why you would spend money testing, spend money on overnight accommodation and travelling, money on racing and then pull out with plenty of laps to run. Track time is important so why not take full advantage. You don’t learn anything stood in the pits. There are drivers racing who will probably never trouble the podium but they don’t just give up. They drive and race for the joy of it. I grew up in a sporting household. Football, Cricket, Snooker and Table tennis were the main games. And one thing I was taught was that that you never give in. Winners don’t quit and Champions don’t give in. Quitting displays a mental fragility. If I were competing I’d play on that. Or am I missing something?

See you at Bayford!!

Click here to read all Club100 Reports

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Report written by Chris Simpson

Photography: Jack Mitchell – JAM Motorsport Photography

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Club100 2017 Round 10 Report – Lights

Club 100 Sprints Round 10 Whilton Mill

The second visit of the year to Whilton Mill and this time using the shorter ‘Zulu’ circuit which turns the flat right handed Inkermans into a tight hairpin before running into a short straight and then a tricky left, right, left sequence of corners known as Zulus one, two and three and named not after some African tribe or 60’s film but christened after the circuit owners dog. The final left hander leads onto the back straight. Some love the configuration and some loathe it but never let it be said that Club 100 doesn’t supply variety.

Into the afternoon and the clouds finally began to break up to give the fine weather the weather forecasters had promised for the Lightweights and Heavyweights/ Super Heavyweights events. And it was good to see a healthy turnout too necessitating B finals in both categories.

Qualifying

Group one

Chris Bell stopped the clock with a sub forty four second lap on his first lying attempt but Chris Woodger beat him to fastest time midway through the session as did Ben Atkinson. Bobby Dawes was next but failing to get under forty four seconds with Thanassi Barnicoat next. A good effort this in his first run in Club 100. He’s raced in Easykarts though so he’s not short of experience.

Group 2

Sammy Venables topped the second group and he was clearly on form with seven out of his eight laps under forty four seconds. Jon Watkins took the second spot with Championship leader Darri Simms third. Second in the Championship standings Liam Cochrane could only manage the sixth quickest time in the session behind Andrew Ward and Seb Algieri.

Lightweight Pre B Final

Four to qualify for the Pre A final and Marc Roberts on pole from Jon Buck with Tom Mackenzie and Oscar Lancaster on row two. Row three, James Haslehurst and James Venning. Roberts led the field away but any chance of qualification disappeared as he ran wide and got swamped by half the field dropping to ninth by the end of the lap leaving Buck in first place from Lancaster. Venning was up to third after a sharp getaway with Mackenzie occupying fourth from Haslehurst. Venning was flying at this point and a lap later he was into second with Lancaster third from Haslehurst and Mackenzie. The order stabilised for a few laps before Venning decided he’d be better off at the front and with six laps run he moved ahead of Buck. Haslehurst by this time was up to third with Darren Martin into fourth whilst Mackenzie remained fifth. Martin’s fourth place lasted just a lap before he spun down the order. Lancaster had dropped to sixth but as Martin fell back he managed to get back ahead of Mackenzie, still in fifth. And that was how they remained all the way to the flag. Venning took the win almost a second clear of Buck with Haslehurst third from Lancaster with Mackenzie just missing out in fifth.

Lightweight Pre A final

Venables on pole from Woodger with Watkins and Atkinson on row two. Then the first of the Championship contenders Bell with Championship leader Simms alongside. Row four, Ward and Algieri with Cochrane and Darling completing the top ten. Venables brought the field up to the start but it was Woodger who made the smarter getaway. Well, not that smart. It was certainly quick bur he’d jumped the start much to his clear annoyance. Venables dropped to third behind Atkinson whilst Watkins got forced wide on the run up to Christmas corner and would be down in thirteenth as the field crossed the line at the end of the first lap. Simms got the better of Bell to run fourth with Bell fifth and Cochrane up to sixth. Darling ran seventh from Algieri.  Woodger continued to lead but with four laps run Venables was up to second ahead of Atkinson. But Venables had been a little too aggressive as he went by Atkinson out of Inkermans which meant the first two runners on the road were both carrying penalties.  Meanwhile Bell was pressing Simms hard into the Boot complex and as Simms ran a little wide Bell moved inside. As they ran down to the final corner Simms looked back over shoulder to see where Cochrane was. The answer was coming up the inside and the Championship leader dropped to sixth.

A lap later and Bell moved ahead of Atkinson for third. Cochrane wasn’t about to let him getaway and pressed Atkinson hard. Out of the final corner at the end of the eighth lap he swept round the outside and overtook on the concrete apron. But he got away with it. Champions luck? Certainly Liam new afterwards that he’d dodged a metaphoric bullet. He immediately closed in on Bell the two of them third and fourth on the road but in reality in first and second.  Two thirds distance and Bell slipped ahead of Venables to try and put some breathing space back to Cochrane. A lap later and he was into first as Woodger fell back to third. By the penultimate la he was down to fifth. At the front Venables was intent on the win and wisely Bell didn’t defend the place too hard knowing his rival would be penalised at the end. Venables crossed the line first but dropped to fourth after his penalty thus handing the win and valuable Championship points to Bell. A relieved Cochrane took second with Atkinson third from Venables. Fifth went to Watkins. After dropping to thirteenth he made steady progress up the order and had a late race battle with Simms. The two of them swapped places a couple of times before Watkins finally broke clear and also got the better of a fading Woodger who finished sixth on the road but dropped to eighth after his penalty was applied. Simms was sixth ahead of Darling. A good drive this. He was on the pace and kept out of trouble. Ward and Fincham completed the top ten.

Lightweight B Final

Marshall on pole from Roberts with Mackenzie and Wood on row two from Rowlands and Martin. Marshall led away from pole with Roberts tucking in behind but it was Rowlands who caught the eye moving quickly into third whilst Wood dropped away. By the end of the third lap he was down to eighth. Marshall continued to stretch his advantage at the front but Roberts was far from safe in second as Mackenzie and Rowlands began to pressure him. Half distance and they were both by. Martin was on a charge and a lap later he moved up to third as the battling Roberts and Rowland held each other up. Marshall was untroubled at the front and Mackenzie was well clear of the battle for third headed now by Martin from Rowlands and Roberts. And that was how they remained to the flag with Marshall taking a comfortable win from Mackenzie who took an equally comfortable second place from the squabbling Martin and Rowlands. But then came the post race drama. Marshall was underweight and excluded handing the win to Mackenzie with Martin promoted into the final qualifying spot ahead of Rowlands by just 0.093.

Lightweights A Final

The final race of the day for the lights. The three main Championship protagonists were all well down the order with Venables on pole from Woodger and Barnicoat and Watkins on row two. Wheeldon and Mather on row three from Ward and Atkinson on four. Row five, Bell and Fincham with second in the Championship Cochrane and Championship leader Simms starting eleventh and twelfth. Venables led the field away and this time Woodger was a little more circumspect off the line tucking in behind the leader as the field streamed up the hill. Barnicoat remained third with Wheeldon next from Watkins. Atkinson moved up a couple of spots whilst Ward and Fincham spun to the back of the field. Cochrane dropped a spot but Simms fared even worse. Coming through the Zulus he got tagged and spun to halt. Despite getting restarted he pulled into the pits and retired. Woodger didn’t allow Venables any respite and was ahead by the end of the second lap having briefly got ahead in the Boot on the first lap.

Watkins quickly recovered lost ground to move into third ahead of Barnicoat, Wheeldon, Atkinson and Bell. Woodger inched away at the front as Venables came under increasing pressure from Watkins and Barnicoat with Bell getting ever closer. Further back Cochrane was beginning to make progress moving into the top ten. Venables finally succumbed to the advances of Watkins and Barnicoat and dropped to fourth. A lap later though and he was back into third with Barnicoat dropping to fifth behind Bell. Bell knew a good result was within his grasp and a good haul of points would see him move back to second in the standings and cut Simms Championship lead and a lap later he was through into third with plenty of laps left to chase down the leaders. He was flying having set fastest lap and establishing a record on the seventh tour. Venables though was desperate to get back on terms and as they went up the hill into Christmas he lunged down the inside from well back making heavy contact and spinning Bell to a halt. Bell would later say he was sure he had enough pace to catch the leaders and win the race but rather than continue he too pulled into the pits and retirement.  Venables continued but within a few more laps he too was into retirement with a mechanical problem. Woodger continued to lead chased by Watkins with Barnicoat third from Atkinson. Cochrane was now up to fifth having taken full advantage of some of the confusion in front of him. And that was how the order remained to the flag.

Podiums and Championships

All smiles on the Lightweight podium with Chris Woodger taking his first win of the season. And well deserved it was too. Jon Watkins second place was his first visit to the podium since winning at round four whilst Thanassi Barnicoat can be well satisfied with third in his first Club 100 outing. Tom Mackenzie too can be well satisfied with his day after winning the B Final and taking home a trophy.

It wasn’t a great day for the three main Championship contenders and certainly Darri Simms will be glad to see the back of Whilton this year having been taken out of both A finals on both visits this year. Nevertheless he continues to lead the Championship but his lead has been cut whilst Liam Cochrane gained a bit of ground and increased his lead by a few points over third placed Chris Bell.  Despite a poor day Liam never gave up the fight.  With two rounds to go who is going to be mentally the strongest driver? Who will handle the pressure best?

Reflections

Another great days racing at Whilton but it was a great shame that JV had to lay down the law after the first two Clubman’s races had to be restarted. Hearing drivers claiming that other drivers were deliberately turning into other drivers or driving people off the track is not good. All drivers have a responsibility to their fellow competitors. We want to see good clean racing with drivers showing each other respect. Take heed.

I must admit I struggle sometimes to understand the mindset of some drivers and not just with regard to driving standards. I had harsh words for a couple of them in the paddock after they had retired healthy Karts. It’s true they weren’t going to win but I just don’t get why you would spend money testing, spend money on overnight accommodation and travelling, money on racing and then pull out with plenty of laps to run. Track time is important so why not take full advantage. You don’t learn anything stood in the pits. There are drivers racing who will probably never trouble the podium but they don’t just give up. They drive and race for the joy of it. I grew up in a sporting household. Football, Cricket, Snooker and Table tennis were the main games. And one thing I was taught was that that you never give in. Winners don’t quit and Champions don’t give in. Quitting displays a mental fragility. If I were competing I’d play on that. Or am I missing something?

See you at Bayford!!

Click here to read all Club100 Reports

Click here to see more Club100 Videos

Report written by Chris Simpson

Photography: Jack Mitchell – JAM Motorsport Photography

Like this article? Then check out all our other race reports here:

All National Racing reports

Main Race Reports page